Kitchen & Bath Design News

APR 2019

Kitchen & Bath Design News is the industry's leading business, design and product resource for the kitchen and bath trade.

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more window treatments for privacy. But now the trend is to- ward open windows, and even doors that open up a whole wall so people can really move from the indoors to the outdoors." Linda Sonders, Linda Sonders Design, in Naples, FL, notes that most of her clients want an outdoor kitchen. "Virtually all single-family homes have outdoor kitchens in Florida, given our 12-month-a-year outdoor living possibilities," she says. "Ironically, it's the summer months that drive us inside, given the humidity." Jeremy McFarland, principal, Brickmoon Design in Houston, TX, agrees. "At all price points, there is a conversa- tion about the outdoor space…about how it will function and how it will flow," he says. "At a minimum, most people will have a grill, but we'll see everything from the basic grill to a true outdoor kitchen." And outdoor spaces aren't just for warmer climates, as proven by Amy Mangold, AIA/principal architect/partner, Scott Simpson Builders, in Northbrook, IL. In recent years, she indicates, there hasn't been a client who hasn't wanted to focus on some sort of exterior living space, which, in addition to kitchens, can also include terraces, pools and spas. "We just finished a job where the master suite is on the first floor with French doors that open to a terrace with radiant heat," she says. "The homeowners can walk across the heated surface to a spa. It's like resort living. We have found there isn't a single project that isn't incorporating some sort of out- door room or space. For us, the term 'outdoor kitchen' is a bit limiting because we are doing so much more." ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS Like indoor spaces, finances heavily influence the design of any outdoor kitchen. For McFarland, homeowners with high-end budgets are still including 'the works,' such as a recent custom home that actually features two outdoor cooking areas. The screened porch has a built-in grill with ventilation hood, side burner and stainless steel backsplash, two undercounter refrigerators, a sink, a pull-out trash and plenty of storage and countertop space fashioned from granite…all of which sits adjacent to the dining table and seating area with a fireplace and television. Heaters in the ceiling add warmth on chilly days. The second cooking area, which features a wood-burning pizza oven and fire pit, is an open-air space positioned closer to the lake. However, he also sees some clients pulling back a bit and downsizing their outdoor spaces. "It depends on which client lens I'm looking through," he explains. "In mid-range homes, we're seeing more of a trend toward smaller outdoor kitchens. We often hear people say they had a large space with all of the amenities but they just didn't use it as much as they thought they would. They still want a grill, an undercounter refrigerator and pull-out trash. But not everyone needs a sink or bar/island since they usually have seating adjacent to the cooking area." McFarland also notes that, in general, outdoor, or 'sum- mer,' kitchens don't need to be as spacious as their indoor counterparts because people use them differently. "People don't usually congregate in an outdoor kitchen like they do inside," he says, noting the inclusion of nearby sitting areas keep guests within communication range. "And, there aren't typically multiple chefs working in the kitchen. Instead, Designed by Jeremy McFarland, this custom home features two outdoor cooking areas. The screened porch has a built-in grill with ventilation hood, side burner and stainless steel backsplash, two undercounter refrigerators, a sink, a pull-out trash and plenty of storage and countertop space. All of these sit adjacent to the dining table and seating area with a fireplace and television. Heaters in the ceiling provide warmth on chilly days. The second cooking area, which features a wood-burning pizza oven and fire pit, is an open-air space positioned closer to the lake. Virtually all of Linda Sonders's clients with single-family homes have outdoor kitchens, such as this one she designed in collabora- tion with MHK Architecture, Waterside Builders and Architectural Land Design. Photos: Kerry Kirk Photography April 2019 • KitchenBathDesign.com 39

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